BISMARCK, N.D. – Facebook Founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg visited the Bakken yesterday and had the opportunity to tour an oil rig near Williston, N.D. During the two hour tour, Zuckerberg visited with oil and gas employees and learned about the industry’s advancements in technology, safety and opportunity.

“It was a tremendous opportunity and a lot of fun to provide a Bakken drilling rig tour for Mark Zuckerberg as part of his visit America tour,” said Ron Ness, President of the North Dakota Petroleum Council. “He had more questions than we had time in our two hours at the rig, and he took the time to meet and visit with many of the employees and learn about their jobs and experiences in North Dakota.”

The tour was organized by the North Dakota Petroleum Council with help from Statoil, Nabors Drilling and Neset Consulting Service as part of Zuckerberg’s plan to visit all 50 states. During the tour, Zuckerberg had a candid conversation with rig crew members about working in the industry, how the industry in North Dakota has afforded them opportunity they could not find at home, as well as how safety has grown tremendously along with technological advancement to enhance rather than replace their jobs.

“Regardless of your views on energy, I think you’ll find the community around this fascinating,” Zuckerberg wrote in a Facebook post early Wednesday morning. “Many people I talked to here acknowledged (climate change), but also feel a sense of pride that their work contributes to serving real needs we all have every day – keeping our homes warm, getting to work, feeding us and more.”

“This was an amazing opportunity to share information with a technology leader,” said Ness. “He now had a much broader grasp of our industry.”

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About the North Dakota Petroleum Council
Since 1952, the Petroleum Council has been the primary voice of the oil and gas industry in North Dakota. The Petroleum Council represents more than 500 companies involved in all aspects of the oil and gas industry, including oil and gas production, refining, pipeline, mineral leasing, consulting, legal work, and oil field service activities in North Dakota, South Dakota, and the Rocky Mountain Region. For more information, go to www.ndoil.org.

Media Contact: Tessa Sandstrom, Communications Manager  |  ND Petroleum Council
701.223.6380, tsandstrom@ndoil.org

Telecommuting Advertising Sales Representative

Not the job for everyone, we are seeking that perfect candidate who wants to make money, but doesn’t need a “full-time benefit J.O.B.”

>>> Be your own boss, partially retired, stay-at-home mom’s, filling in the gaps of other revenue streams, want to earn extra money for your family ? This would be a perfect fit for you!

Flexibility with the opportunity to make full time wages setting your own schedule and working from your own home office.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR an Advertising Representative. A personable, self-starter, proficient with technology who is fun, outgoing, efficient, inventive, and AWESOME! Our company culture is built from a family orientated small-business full of fun-loving, hard-working, dedicated individuals.

Estimated commissions: $1,500 to $5,000+ per month; based on how much you work it. Sales is a numbers games folks!

Must be able to communicate professionally with industry businesses and colleagues, data manage a large evolving list, work by internet, email and phone, and collaborate with the team.

DO NOT EMAIL YOUR RESUME….PLEASE *CALL*
Mary (406 three three three-2148) and see if you can sell me 😉
Think about your sales proposal (i.e. time devoted to working your sales funnel, how you plan to fill your sales funnel, number of touches per week, sales strategy).

Get a look at our past issues online, in our Digital Journal: http://bakkenoilbiz.com/digital-journal/

WEBSITE: http://bakkenoilbiz.com/
FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/BakkenOilBusinessJournal
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/#!/BakkenOilBiz

Bismarck, N.D. – The failure of the repeal of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) final rules regarding methane emissions on federal and tribal lands is an affront to North Dakota and state primacy, says North Dakota Petroleum Council President Ron Ness.

“The industry supports the goals of capturing greater quantities of associated gas and reducing waste but this duplicative and unnecessary rule comes at an enormous cost to the state’s economy, tax revenues and private mineral owners.

“We are extremely disappointed in Senator Heitkamp’s decision today to vote against the repeal of this rule. Hundreds of energy employees and numerous businesses, chambers of commerce and trade associations wrote to express concern for the rule. Despite this, Senator Heitkamp has chosen to stand with the environmental activists and the Democratic party in Washington rather than the oil and gas workers and people of North Dakota.

“This rule will provide no environmental benefits, will only increase costs for state and federal governments and the industry, and will further burden already overtaxed federal employees and dilute their ability to perform essential duties. Instead, Senator Heitkamp could have been the deciding vote that would have allowed the BLM and other federal agencies to make a larger, more immediate impact on reducing flaring and venting by focusing on fixing permitting, infrastructure and pipeline delays.

“Just yesterday, Senator Heitkamp applauded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s decision to grant the state primacy and regulatory authority over CO2 injection wells and the certainty it would bring for North Dakota energy. Her decision today is a complete reversal of that stance. North Dakota already has some of the most comprehensive regulations addressing flaring and waste in the nation. Over the past two years, North Dakota has adopted a series of strict gas capture targets. At the same time, the industry has voluntarily made huge strides in natural gas capture by investing more than $13 billion in natural gas infrastructure since 2006. As a result, flaring has declined by more than 54 percent in just three years even as natural gas production has increased. This progress will only be threatened by the continued uncertainty and bureaucratic red tape brought on by the BLM rule, discouraging innovation and complicating the process for approving infrastructure that will ultimately ensure the capture of more of our valuable natural gas resources.

“We are grateful for Senator Hoeven and Congressman Cramer’s hard work and support for North Dakota Energy and energy workers. We look forward to working with them to pursue other avenues of rescinding this detrimental rule.”

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About the North Dakota Petroleum Council
Since 1952, the Petroleum Council has been the primary voice of the oil and gas industry in North Dakota. The Petroleum Council represents more than 500 companies involved in all aspects of the oil and gas industry, including oil and gas production, refining, pipeline, mineral leasing, consulting, legal work, and oil field service activities in North Dakota, South Dakota, and the Rocky Mountain Region. For more information, go to www.ndoil.org.

Media Contact:
TESSA SANDSTROM
Director of Communications, NDPC
T. 701.223.6380
EnergyOfNorthDakota.com | NDOil.org

XTO accepting applications for Give Back to the Bakken grant program

XTO Energy is dedicated to supporting the communities where we operate – where our employees live, work and volunteer. The communities located in the Bakken formation area – eastern Montana and western North Dakota – have welcomed XTO Energy. To show our appreciation, we want to Give Back to the Bakken.

A few days remain for nonprofit organizations in Montana and North Dakota to apply for two $25,000 grants from XTO Energy.

The grants, says XTO Energy, is a show of appreciation for the communities in eastern Montana and western North Dakota who have welcomed the company and its employees into their communities.

The two grants will be awarded to organizations that are meeting a demonstrated need for communities in the Bakken. Grant requests are due on October 31.

Click here for application guidelines and more information.

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(Photo courtesy of State Historical Society of North Dakota, William E. (Bill) Shemorry Photograph Collection)

April marks 65 years since North Dakota first became an oil producing state. Although there have been ups and downs, the industry continues today and is among the top oil producers in the world.  And it all started with the Clarence Iverson #1.

According to Clarence Herz, legend had it that when a landman approached a North Dakota wheat farmer about leasing his mineral rights for oil exploration he said he’d be glad to sign a lease and quipped, “I’ll drink all the oil you get in North Dakota.”

Herz continues:
On April 4th, 1951, North Dakota, after unsuccessfully exploring for 34 years, became the 27th state to produce petroleum.  The discovery well, Amerada Petroleum’s Clarence Iverson #1, produced nearly 250 barrels of oil per day.  It was North Dakota’s only producing well in 1951, as the other 9 attempts, all outside of the Williston Basin, were dry holes. The other nine wells, none of which were drilled by Amerada, were in Cavalier (4), Grand Forks, Morton, Pembina, Pierce, and Stutsman counties.

Click here to continue reading the history of North Dakota’s first well.

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19th Annual Dickinson API Gumbo Cookoff – hosted by Dickinson API Chapter
18 teams will square off for best gumbo. Prizes, raffles, live music, dancing and more!
When:          Saturday, February 20
11:00 a.m.   Teams start cooking; public is welcome to attend and watch;
6:30 p.m.     Gumbo tasting starts until gone
8:30 p.m.     Live Music and dance with EZ Street Band
Where:         Quality Inn & Suites, Dickinson, ND
More Info:    http://apidickinson.org/event/api-gumbo-cookoff/?instance_id=30

4th Annual Bakken BBQ
Industry teams join forces to BBQ for Make-a-Wish Foundation!
When:          June 17, 2016
Where:         West River Ice Rink
More Info:   https://www.facebook.com/BBQ4Cause/?fref=ts

North Dakota Oil Can! Teacher Seminar
Teachers are invited to attend a seminar to learn the ins and outs of the oil industry, tour a well site and other facilities, and take lesson plans back to their classrooms all while earning continuing educatoin credits.
When:         June 20-23, 2016
Where:        Bismarck, ND
More info:  The seminar is limited to just 50 teachers, but there are still spots available. Learn more and apply at http://www.ndoil.org/events/teacher_education/.

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Registration for the North Dakota Petroleum Council’s (NDPC) 34th Annual Meeting to be held in Fargo, N.D., on Sept. 21-23, 2015 will open July 8. The Annual Meeting will include presentations from several industry leaders and key decision makers who will focus on the biggest issues and challenges facing the oil and gas industry today.

In addition to the Annual Meeting, the NDPC will co-host an informational seminar, “Drilling Bits and Coding Bytes” that will be free and open the public. The seminar will focus on the technological advances and contributions that Fargo-area businesses are making to enhance the petroleum industry. A Bakken Basics Information Session will also be held for those wishing to learn more about oil and gas development from industry experts.

“We are excited to be in Fargo this year for our annual meeting,” said Ron Ness, president for the NDPC. “The opportunities extend far beyond the Bakken, into the Red River Valley and across state borders. There are tremendous opportunities for entrepreneurs to find their niche and help mold a modern, technology-driven oilfield. There’s no better place that proves that better than Fargo, which is home to world-class technology and research facilities.”

“We are so excited and proud to be hosting our first North Dakota Petroleum event in Fargo,” said Jill Halvorson with the Fargo-Moorhead Convention & Visitors Bureau. “It is an honor to be able to show off what we love about Fargo to a group that is coming from all across our great state. We will be pulling out all the stops to make sure that when they leave on Sept. 23, the question will be ‘When can we come back?’”

The information sessions and seminar will be held Monday, Sept. 21 in the Fargo Theater in Downtown Fargo and are free to attend.

The NDPC Annual Meeting will be held at the Ramada Plaza Suites on Sept. 22 and 23. Registration for NDPC members is $300 and $600 for nonmembers. For registration and more information about the meeting, including a full list of hotels in Fargo, dining, flights, and the most up-to-date agenda, visit https://annualmeeting.risprojects.org/Default.aspx.

Media wishing to register for the annual meeting may request media credentials from Tessa Sandstrom at 701-557-7744 or tsandstrom@ndoil.org.
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Since 1952, the Petroleum Council has been the primary voice of the oil and gas industry in North Dakota. The Petroleum Council represents more than 525 companies involved in all aspects of the oil and gas industry, including oil and gas production, refining, pipeline, mineral leasing, consulting, legal work, and oil field service activities in North Dakota, South Dakota, and the Rocky Mountain Region. For more information, go to www.ndoil.org.

Media Contact:
Tessa Sandstrom | Communications Manager, ND Petroleum Council | 701.223.6380 | tsandstrom@ndoil.org

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AlexEpstein-EarthDay_FossilFuels

From Alex Epstein – CENTER for INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
On Earth Day, I’m asking my friends and fans to join me in celebrating fossil fuels—coal, oil, and natural gas—by watching and sharing “Why You Should Love Fossil Fuels”, a video I helped create with Dennis Prager and his team at Prager University. The five minute “course” has already drawn over 130,000 views since it was posted yesterday. (In comparison, my most-viewed video before this has 22,000.) Please share far and wide, for it’s time we stop thinking about how to save the planet from human beings, and instead resume thinking about how to improve the planet for human beings. — Alex

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“Economic Contributions” of the Oil and Gas Industry in 2013” Infographic 2013-Economic-Impactv2-1 2013-Economic-Impactv2-2

Bismarck, N.D. – The oil and gas industry has seen its economic output rise by 750 percent to $43 billion since 2005, according to a study conducted by the North Dakota State University’s Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics. The study also found that the industry directly supported 55,137 full time equivalent jobs and supported another 26,403 secondary full-time jobs. This increase represents the growing importance oil and gas development has on the state’s overall economic health.

“This study helps confirm that the petroleum industry is one of the largest basic-sector industries in North Dakota,” said Dean Bangsund, co-author of the study and research scientist for the department at NDSU. “Although activity is concentrated in the western part of the state, the magnitude of the contributions to both the state and local governments and the sheer volume of secondary economic effects in nearly all sectors of the North Dakota economy would suggest that the economic effects of the industry are felt statewide.”

Because the industry relies on hundreds of contractors and subcontractors, the economic contributions extend beyond the mining and extraction industries. According to the study, retail trade once again saw the largest impact, taking in $11.3 billion of the $43 billion. Households, or personal income, saw the second-largest impact at $9.3 billion, and the Finance, Insurance and Real Estate industry ($4.5 billion) overtook the government ($4.4 billion), which was the third-largest beneficiary in 2011. More than six other industries in North Dakota also benefitted from oil and gas development.

“The positive impacts of oil and gas development extend far beyond just the energy industry, and benefit many of our small and independent businesses in the oil patch and across the state,” said Rae Ann Kelsch, state director of the North Dakota chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business. “This is great news, but what is perhaps more exciting for our organization and members is the fact that the $43 billion only represents 48 percent of the total economic output. That means there is a demand for services within the state that our members can begin taking a look at and capitalizing upon to keep even more of those dollars here in our state.”

Among the study’s key findings:

· The oil and gas industry generated $43 billion for North Dakota’s Economy: In 2013, direct impacts of the oil and gas industry were $17 billion and secondary impacts were $25.7 billion for a total of $43 billion in business activity. For every dollar spent in the state by the oil and gas industry, another $1.43 in additional business activity was generated.

· The oil and gas industry created more than 80,000 jobs statewide: The study reveals that the oil and gas industry’s economic importance to the state includes direct employment for 55,137 full-time jobs and secondary employment of 26,403 full-time equivalent jobs.

· The industry contributed $9.3 billion in economy-wide personal income: The study reveals that the oil and gas industry contributed $9.3 billion in economy-wide personal income, including $1.425 billion in in-state private royalties and $300 million in lease bonuses. This is a 382 percent increase since 2005.

· The oil and gas industry generated $4.4 billion in government revenues: According to the study, the oil and gas industry generated a total of $4.4 billion in government revenues, including:
o $2.9 billion in gross production and severance taxes;
o $654 million in royalties, including $304 million in state royalties, $349 million in federal royalties, including tribal royalties;
o $49.6 million in state lease bonuses, and $4.1 million in federal lease bonuses that were returned to the state;
o $62.6 million in direct sales and use taxes;
o $50.5 million in corporate and personal income taxes;
o $54.6 million in licenses, permits, and fees;
o $12.5 million in charitable donations;
o $322.3 million in indirect state government general tax collections.

· The oil and gas industry supported $28.5 billion in non-industry business activity: The oil and gas industry benefited other industries and sectors statewide, including $11.3 billion in statewide retail sales; $4.5 billion in finance, insurance and real estate; $2.8 billion in business and personal services; $2.3 billion in communications and public utilities; $2.2 billion in professional and social services; $1.8 billion in construction; $1.5 billion in other sectors (various ag and mining); $1.3 billion in manufacturing; and, $838 million in transportation.

The North Dakota Petroleum Council (NDPC) has commissioned the study each biennium since 2005, and economic benefits have risen dramatically. Economic impacts have grown by 750 percent since the first study in 2005. State and local government revenues grew by more than $3.73 billion—or 1,150 percent—since 2005, while industry-wide direct employment grew by 992 percent from 5,051 in 2005 to 56,137 in 2013.

“We’ve seen a dramatic growth in production, and along with it, a dramatic growth in the economic contributions and associated job creation,” said Ron Ness, president of the NDPC. “Obviously, as prices decrease, the benefits previously enjoyed by the state government, households and other industries will be much lower as we work through the current price drop – no doubt impacts many are beginning to feel. We must be cautious to not further hinder these positive economic impacts through onerous or unnecessary regulation.”

The study was conducted by research scientist Dean Bangsund and Dr. Nancy Hodur, Research Assistant Professor at the NDSU Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics. Bangsund and Hodur surveyed firms engaged in exploration and development, extraction and production, transportation, and processing of crude oil and natural gas. Data that was measured in this study but not included in previous surveys was an assessment of capital expenditures for infrastructure projects. To view the full study, visit http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/.

ATTACHMENT: “Economic Contributions” of the Oil and Gas Industry in 2013” Infographic

Since 1952, the Petroleum Council has been the primary voice of the oil and gas industry in North Dakota. The Petroleum Council represents more than 500 companies involved in all aspects of the oil and gas industry, including oil and gas production, refining, pipeline, mineral leasing, consulting, legal work, and oil field service activities in North Dakota, South Dakota, and the Rocky Mountain Region. For more information, go to www.ndoil.org.

Media Contact:
Tessa Sandstrom
Communications Manager
ND Petroleum Council
701.223.6380
tsandstrom@ndoil.org

INTRODUCTION by Bob van der Valk, Senior Editor  |  Bakken Oil Business Journal

“In October 2014 crude oil barrels went down 4M barrels/day from 1,186,228 to 1,182,174 barrels/day.  The drilling rig count dropped 2 from September to October, an additional 3 from October to November, and has since fallen 5 more from November to today. The number of well completions decreased from 193(final) in September to 134(preliminary) in October. Three significant forces are driving the slow-down: oil price, flaring reduction, and oil conditioning.”

NDIC Department of Mineral Resources Director’s Cut Newsletter
December 13, 2014 – Lynn Helms

Crude Oil production:
Sep Oil 35,586,832 barrels = 1,186,228 barrels/day
Oct Oil 36,647,393 barrels = 1,182,174 barrels/day (preliminary)
1,118,010 barrels per day or 95% from Bakken and Three Forks
64,164 barrels per day or 5% from legacy conventional pools

Natural Gas Production:
Sep Gas 42,400,766 MCF = 1,413,359 MCF/day
Oct Gas 44,317,381 MCF = 1,429,593 MCF/day (preliminary)(NEW all-time high)
Sep Producing Wells = 11,758
Oct Producing Wells = 11,892 (preliminary)(NEW all-time high)
8,406 wells or 71% are now unconventional Bakken – Three forks wells
3,486 wells or 29% produce from legacy conventional pools

Permits issued:
Sep Permitting: 261 drilling and 2 seismic
Oct Permitting: 328 drilling and 1 seismic
Nov Permitting: 235 drilling and 1 seismic (all time high was 370 in 10/2012)

Crude oil pricing:
Sep Sweet Crude Price = $74.85/barrel
Oct Sweet Crude Price = $68.94/barrel
Nov Sweet Crude Price = $60.61/barrel
Today Sweet Crude Price = $41.75/barrel (lowest since March 2009) (all-time high was $136.29 7/3/2008)

Rig Count:
Sep rig count 193
Oct rig count 191
Nov rig count 188
Today’s rig count is 183 (all-time high was 218 on 5/29/2012)
The statewide rig count is down 16% from the high and in the five most active counties rig count is down as follows:
Divide -69% (high was 3/2013)
Dunn -26% (high was 6/2012)
McKenzie -15% (high was 1/2014)
Mountrail -20% (high was 6/2011)
Williams -16% (high was 10/2014)

Comments:
The drilling rig count dropped 2 from September to October, an additional 3 from October to November, and has since fallen 5 more from November to today. The number of well completions decreased from 193(final) in September to 134(preliminary) in October. Three significant forces are driving the slow-down: oil price, flaring reduction, and oil conditioning. Several operators have reported postponing completion work to achieve the NDIC gas capture goals. There were no major precipitation events, but there were 9 days with wind speeds in excess of 35 mph (too high for completion work).

Over 95% of drilling still targets the Bakken and Three Forks formations.

The drillers outpaced completion crews in October. At the end of October there were about 650 wells waiting on completion services, an increase of 40.

Crude oil take away capacity is expected to remain adequate as long as rail deliveries to coastal refineries keep growing.

Rig count in the Williston Basin is set to fall rapidly during the first quarter of 2015. Utilization rate for rigs capable of 20,000+ feet is currently about 90%, and for shallow well rigs (7,000 feet or less) about 60%.

Drilling permit activity peaked in October as operators worked on their summer programs, planned locations for next winter, and adjusted capital budgets.

The number of rigs actively drilling on federal surface in the Dakota Prairie Grasslands is down from 6 to 3.

Activity on the Fort Berthold Reservation is as follows:
28 drilling rigs (11 on fee lands and 17 on trust lands)
386,679 barrels of oil per day (149,547 from trust lands & 237,131 from fee lands)
1,371 active wells (1,044 on trust lands & 327 on fee lands)
172 wells waiting on completion
346 approved drilling permits (306 on trust lands & 40 on fee lands)
1,997 additional potential future wells (1,224 on trust lands & 773 on fee lands)

Seismic activity is slowing down with 5 surveys active/recording, 1 remediating, 0 suspended, and 1 permitted. There are now 3 buried arrays in North Dakota for monitoring and optimizing hydraulic fracturing.

North Dakota leasing activity is very low, consisting mostly of renewals and top leases in the Bakken – Three Forks area.

US natural gas storage is now 10% below the five-year average indicating slowly increasing prices in the future. North Dakota shallow gas exploration could be economic at future gas prices. As you are aware there is some exploration underway in Emmons County. The first well will be on confidential status until 12/23/14.

The price of natural gas delivered to Northern Border at Watford City is down $0.76 to $2.98/MCF. This results in a current oil to gas price ratio of 14 to 1. The percentage of gas flared dropped to 22%. The Tioga gas plant remained below 70% of full capacity due to delayed expansion of gas gathering from south of Lake Sakakawea.
capture percentage was 78% with the daily volume of gas flared from Sep to Oct decreasing 32.8 MMCFD. The historical high flared percent was 36% in 09/2011.

Gas capture statistics are as follows:
Statewide 78%
Statewide Bakken 78%
Non-FBIR Bakken 79%
FBIR Bakken 75%
October 2014 capture target =74%
January 2015 capture target =77%

BLM revised final regulations for hydraulic fracturing on federal and Indian lands were sent to the White House Office of Management and Budget for interagency review on Oct 26 and Department of Interior continues to be committed to their goal of issuing a final rule by the end of 2014. After initial publication in 2012, BLM received over 177,000 comments and withdrew the rule. A new proposed rule was published in the federal register on 5/24/2013 and the comment period ended 8/23/2013. This time BLM received over 1.2 million comments. Thanks to all who provided comments in support of a “states first” policy.
BLM has started the process of new venting and flaring regulations with input sessions in Denver, Albuquerque, Dickinson, and Washington, DC.

EPA published an advanced notice of proposed rule-making to seek comment on the information that should be reported or disclosed for hydraulic fracturing chemical substances and mixtures and the mechanism for obtaining this information. The proposed rule-making is in response to a petition from Earthjustice and 114 other groups who are opposed to the use of the GWPC-IOGCC FracFocus website process of chemical disclosure and any type of trade secret protection for hydraulic fracturing fluid mixtures. These groups are requesting EPA regulation of chemical disclosure under the federal Toxic Substances Control Act.

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